The Social Business

Category: Transport

Our plans for Zero Waste Leeds

I’ve written previously about our plans to get involved with local approaches to tackling climate change in Leeds.

You may remember that I  joined Leeds Climate Commission last year, and that the Board of the social enterprise I help to run gave me some time to explore a range of different environmental business ideas – to see if we could identify an opportunity to get involved with tackling an issue locally.

In short, we looked at three ideas – community energy, transport, and waste & recycling.

Whilst we were very interested in community energy, we reached a stage where we needed more money, and greater expertise, to really take things further, so we stopped exploring that before Christmas.  Having said that, we’re always open to ideas – and it may be that this is one we pick up again in the future – perhaps working with other people with greater sector-specific expertise.   Please contact us if you want to chat about opportunities around community energy in Leeds.

Transport is a fascinating one for me personally, as you’ll notice if you scroll through the #LeedsTransport hashtag on Twitter.  I joined the local Transport Consultation Sub-Committee at West Yorkshire Combined Authority, and I work hard in my own time to keep up to speed with interesting ideas around transport & sustainable cities from around the world.

But,  realistically, this was always going to be an issue for us to campaign on, rather than explore from a business perspective.  I’ll keep exploring it, in my own time, including looking at issues around transport poverty with Leeds Poverty Truth Commission.  And if there are pieces of work that people would like our input into, I’d be interested in being involved.

Waste and recycling proved to be an issue with many more opportunities to explore, as I outlined in this post.  Since we met up with over 30 people working on this in January, we’ve continued to explore ideas under the Zero Waste Leeds banner – whilst we’ve also been working hard to build up a following on Twitter and Facebook.

Our plan is to pilot a range of ideas over a nine month period  – around a number of themes – looking at opportunities to help Leeds as a city to waste less, whilst also reusing, repairing and recycling more.

After a funder expressed an interest in what we were doing, we’ve put together a proposal for the pilot, focusing on the following five areas of work:

  • Engaging social enterprises in the Council’s new Waste Strategy
  • Marketing, communications and community engagement
  • Collaboration, business development and innovation
  • Proving social impact
  • Securing long-term investment and funding

We’re keen to chat with other potential funders, sponsors and investors, so if you are interested in our work, or you have ideas on who we should contact, please get in touch.

We’re confident we can make something happen here.  We know how big a social issue this is – and it feels like there’s an opportunity that wasn’t there as recently as six months ago.  The whole Blue Planet II phenomenon – and the interest it’s generated in plastic waste – has raised public consciousness on issues to do with waste.  We want to capitalise on that interest and turn it into a range of practical actions in our city.

We know it won’t be easy, but we’re confident that  the way we work at Social Business Brokers – tirelessly tapping into our networks to explore ways we can collaborate with others  & change things – gives us a good chance to make stuff happen.

We’ve done it before – most successfully with Empty Homes Doctor – which started with a text conversation between me and my social business partner Gill when we were each sat at home watching George Clarke talking about empty homes on Channel 4.  We took an idea – spotted an opportunity – and turned it into a sustainable social business – that, with Leeds City Council support, has brought back into use nearly 300 long-term empty homes in the last five years.

And – working with a wide range of other people – we helped to take Leeds Community Homes from an idea and establish it as one of the UK’s first urban Community Land Trusts – which raised £360,000 through a pioneering community share offer.

We don’t know exactly what will emerge from Zero Waste Leeds, but we’re confident something – or more likely some things – will.  But, to be frank, we’ll need support to get it going.  We’ve funded our work on this so far ourselves, and we can probably only commit to it for a couple of months more.  If we’re not successful in securing some funding or investment for a pilot, Zero Waste Leeds may have to go back on the “nice ideas” shelf.  I for one would be really disappointed if that turned out to be the case.


 

If you’re interested in what we do and may be interested in supporting our work, please get in touch – our contact details are here

Car hire companies: I’m not a cyclist – I’m your regular customer

We’ve not owned a car for around seven years now.  But that’s not to say I never drive – on average we hire a car around once a month.  Sometimes for weekends, often for holidays, and on the odd occasion for work.

It works well for us.  Neither of us routinely needs a car for work – and our journeys to work are pretty easily made on the bike or on the bus.  My son, whose seven years at school have coincided with those seven car free years, walks the 30 minute journey to school.

But a car is there when we need it.  Both for longer hires from car hire firms like Avis and Enterprise, and for shorter rentals, from our local car club – now owned by Enterprise too.

There’s lots that I like about organising how we get around in this way.  I like the fact that, by and large, we choose the most appropriate mode of transport for each journey.  So when walking makes most sense, we walk.  When cycling fits the bill, we get the bikes out.  Heading into town as a family?  The bus, usually.  Longer weekend journeys?  The train when it makes most sense (practically and financially) – and if not, a hire car.  A small, cheap car if it’s just us, and a bigger car or van if we need the extra room for bikes, Christmas presents or camping gear.

Compare that with what tends to happen when you own a car.  It’s sat there on the drive, waiting to be driven (some studies suggest they spend up to 95% of their life doing nothing).  So when you need to go somewhere, the car is the obvious choice.  It appears convenient, and it appears cheap.  £4.30 return for a 2 mile bus journey – or perhaps a notional 20p in fuel to drive?  It’s obvious what choice most people will make – even if the true cost per mile is much higher.

I would say that is one of the main problems with our current ownership model for cars.  Individual ownership makes traveling in a car the default choice for most journeys many of us make in cities – when, for some of those journeys at least, another mode of transport would be better all ways round.

So I’m hopeful that over time we’ll move away from individual ownership of cars – and move more towards a model where we “buy mobility”.  This is the emerging Mobility As A Service model where, easily organised via your phone, it’s easy to jump on the bus, book a taxi, pick up a dockless bike, hire a car for an hour, buy a train ticket – whichever mode of transport makes most sense for that particular journey.  In a small, low-tech, much-more-difficult-than-it-needs-to-be way, that’s what we currently do as a family.  And on balance, I love it.

But today I’m focusing on cars – prompted by a tweet from car hire company Sixt.

I’m not pretending I was “offended” or anything like that.  I just thought it was a poor piece of marketing.  In large part, because of what I’ve outlined above.

I am 100% their target customer.  I don’t own a car and spend over a grand a year on car hire.  And, in their eyes, I’m a “cyclist” – the customer group they’ve clumsily targeted.

But that’s where they’re wrong.  I am not a cyclist.  I am someone who wants to get from A to B, and I choose the most appropriate way to do that.  I mainly cycle precisely because for the majority of my journeys, (peak time commutes in Leeds)  it’s the quickest option.  I want to go faster.   Effortlessly gliding past queues of stationery cars and getting to work on time is the ultimate performance boost.

Yet I do need a car from time to time, and whilst I’m very happy with a lot of the service I get from the hire companies I routinely use (in particular the consistently excellent staff at Avis in Leeds),  it fascinates me that they don’t better serve the regular, “multimodal” hirer.  This clumsy piece of marketing points to a wider inability to make the most of a growing customer group.

For example, I have lost count of the number of times I’ve turned up a car hire places, on my bike, and asked where the bike parking is.   I find it bizarre that they seem surprised that someone, who, by definition, is in need of a car at that precise moment, may have turned up by another mode of transport.

If they thought it through properly, there’d be all sorts of other opportunities too.  More electric and hybrid cars are an obvious thing to think about.  Reviewing the classification of cars – and giving people the option of not having a diesel car (it’s still often sold to you as a premium vehicle – because of better fuel economy) could be good too.  As would not always assuming that an upgrade (to a bigger, more expensive to run car) is what the customer wants.  A bigger car is sometimes handy, but I’m buying mobility, not a mobile status symbol.  And don’t get me started on the hard-sell of Collision Damage Waiver insurance….

I care about this because I can see the enormous potential of easier access to on-demand cars, rather than ownership of them.  Our cities could be transformed if more of us chose the most appropriate mode of transport for our journeys, rather than routinely jumping into the car.  We could also stop wasting so much of our disposable income on an asset that sits idle more than half the time.  And I think there are big business opportunities for the companies that get their heads around this emerging market and serve it well.

How can we stop so many people being killed and seriously injured on our roads?

Alongside my interest in transport,  I spend a fair bit of time campaigning on issues around road safety.

You could argue it’s pretty much a lifelong interest – given that I was knocked out of my pram and sent bouncing down the road by a driver who failed to stop at a pedestrian crossing when I was ten weeks old.

But that would be pushing it a little bit.   When I finally got my hands on the £100 of compensation that was put in Trust for me until I was 17, I spent it all on driving lessons.  I couldn’t wait to experience the freedom that a car can offer….

In reality I only really took an interest in these issues – alongside the broader transport and city design issues – when we got rid of our car in 2011.   Over a few months we went from being a family that mainly got around in a car, to a family that mostly got around Leeds on the bus, on foot or on bikes.

I cannot emphasise enough how changing how you get around your city also changes how you look at the place.   I’d always been pretty sympathetic to arguments about the negative impacts of cars, particularly from an environmental point of view.  But like most people I mostly got around in a car.   Suddenly,  without one on the drive, I was seeing Leeds from a whole different perspective.

I’ve written before – and will no doubt write again – about transport – and all the reasons we should be investing in high quality public transport, whilst also making cycling and walking a much more attractive option for short journeys.  But today I want to focus on another aspect of a car-dominated city – the impact on vulnerable road users – people who walk and cycle around their city.

Someone asked me the other day if I’m “angry” about transport in Leeds – as they thought my #LeedsTransport tweets suggested that I was.  In fact I’m not – I’d say I’m exasperated and impatient for change, but mostly not angry.  I’ve certainly (in the main) learnt not to tweet whilst angry at least.

But when it comes to the number of people killed or seriously injured on our roads, I’m angry.   When I consider how the justice system tends to deal with cases where people have been killed by drivers, I’m angry.  And when I see much of what’s being done in the name of reducing the number of people killed or seriously injured on our roads, yes, I’m pretty angry.

It’s hard to summarise such a complex issue.  But in short, I think we have come to accept violence (I choose that word carefully) on our roads  in a way that we would never accept such regular violence in other parts of our lives.

Recently shared statistics suggest that 305 people were killed or seriously injured on Leeds roads in 2017.  That’s down on the previous year, but still significantly above the “target” figure.

I won’t pretend to have considered all the statistics in detail, but another fact stands out – pedestrians and cyclists accounted for 47% of those killed or seriously injured, even though they only account for 13% of journeys made.

And what are we doing to change things?  Again, it’s complex, and again, as much as I try to keep on top of this, it’s something I’m doing in my spare time and as an “amateur”.  But you can read  a summary of what’s being done in the Safer Roads Action Plan at Item 7 here.

I think there’s some good stuff in there – in particular I think the work to redesign streets  (including a focus on “district centres” where there are plenty of people walking, shopping etc) sounds good.

But, as always, there appears to be far too much emphasis on what you might call “educating vulnerable road users to stay safe”, rather than dealing with the source of much of the danger – tackling driver behaviour through enforcement activity.

It’s something that I’ve tried to raise before, particularly with the local Police and Crime Commissioner.   And it’s been raised before by the Council’s Scrutiny Panel – with a report expressing concern about the lack of enforcement activity – caused by a lack of police resources.

My concern is that things will continue to get worse.  We appear to be in a bit of loop – with the Council and their partners focusing on what they do (particularly around road re-design and education) whilst pointing out, year after year, that the lack of police enforcement is an issue.  

It will be interesting to see if this gets raised again at this week’s Scrutiny Panel.

As I make clear, I’m no expert on this.  But day after day, walking and cycling around Leeds, I am put at unnecessary risk by a significant minority of drivers – and I’ve had enough of it.  Too many streets are designed in ways that facilitate the movement of vehicles, at the expense of people walking and cycling.  Whilst the stats I’ve pointed to above confirm the particular impact unsafe streets have on vulnerable road users.

I don’t know what to do – but I think we need some radical action.  Maybe it’s time to look at initiatives like Vision Zero – and start thinking about how we can work towards a target of no-one being seriously injured or killed on our streets.  I can see why such a target might sound ridiculous.  But I think we’ve gone too far the other way – as a society we seem to accept that “accidents” happen.   I think we can do better than that.

How can we help Leeds to become the Best City For Motorists?

There’s an opinion piece in today’s Yorkshire Evening Post on the current state of the transport network in Leeds, written by the Assistant Features Editor Chris Bond.  Chris,  by the sounds of things,  drives four miles into the centre of Leeds to work every day.

The arguments will be familiar to anyone who lives in and travels around Leeds, a city which, as the author suggests, has lots going for it, but has a real issue with traffic congestion, inadequate public transport provision, a lack of high quality cycling infrastructure and, to top it all, issues with poor air quality.

It won’t surprise you to learn that I don’t agree with quite a lot of what’s in the article.  However, I do largely agree with the headline, that Leeds is failing to meet the needs of people who drive.

One of my favourite quotes, from Canadian urbanist Brent Toderian is this one:

“A city built for cars fails for everyone, including those who drive. ”

That’s so true for Leeds.  The arguments are well-rehearsed, and there’s no time to go into them here, but Leeds – Motorway City of The Seventies – is reaping the rewards of that period in which the future appeared destined to revolve around the car.  Efforts to shift that balance (again, well-documented elsewhere) have failed spectacularly over the last 25 years.  So we are where we are – in a city that’s the largest in Europe without a mass transit system.  Where, for many people, for many of their journeys, the car seems like the best bet.

The cause of the near-daily congestion isn’t, as Chris suggests, a car broken down on the inner ring road, or whatever today’s excuse is.  It’s the fact that there are too many people traveling alone in cars, so that when there’s a problem (traffic light failure, collision, broken down car) the system collapses.  There is no resilience – because too many of us are traveling in a way that the system just can’t cope with.

So I agree it’s no fun driving around Leeds.  Where we disagree, by the sounds of things, is around what should be done to sort things out.  Let me pick out a few points where I think we may see things differently.

Parking

It’s a common argument – “It’s so awful driving into Leeds, and when you get there, there aren’t enough parking spaces.  Why don’t they build more?”  As outlined above, the primary cause of congestion is too many people driving into and across the city centre.  Inviting more people in, by making it easier for them to park, will only make the problem worse.  We need to be reducing the amount of city-centre parking, not increasing it.

People, not motorists

The opinion piece is written from the perspective of a “motorist”.  As if we’re defined by one fixed mode of travel.  I don’t think it’s like that.  Most people just want to get from A to B as quickly, comfortably, safely and inexpensively as possible.  We need to stop thinking of people as “motorists” – or “cyclists” for that matter.  We are people trying to get around our city.  The problem is, the more of us who choose to drive, the worse it gets for all of us. 

You’re not in traffic, you are traffic

As is common in articles such as this, the author appears to believe that problems are all to do with other people, and nothing to do with personal choices.  As someone who hasn’t owned a car for seven years, I know the buses aren’t as good as they should be.  I know cycling doesn’t feel as safe as it should. 

But I also know that if I hire a car and drive it into Leeds at 745am, I’m part of the problem.  I am traffic. 

I’d like people to take a bit more responsibility for the impact of their personal choices. I know life’s complicated,  and I don’t expect everyone to rush to the bike shop and suddenly start making all their journeys on two wheels.  But I also don’t buy the common narrative around “no choice”.

Amsterdam wasn’t always like Amsterdam

One thing it sounds like Chris and I can agree on is that Bordeaux is a great place.  I’ve visited twice in the last couple of years and it really is beautiful.  And it’s a great place to get around – when by all accounts a few years ago it certainly wasn’t.

What’s changed?  It’s invested in public transport, cycle infrastructure and decent, pedestrianised public space.  It’s prioritised sustainable forms of travel and made it more difficult to drive into the centre, or park there.  It’s one of the reasons why I want to keep going back.

Similarly Amsterdam was a very different place 40 years ago, dominated by cars.  Years of investment – and prioritisation of sustainable forms of travel over inefficient travel modes like cars, have turned it into the place we know today.  Same for Copenhagen, and, more recently, to a certain extent, for London.

I know that’s not a great deal of use for this afternoon’s commute home, but it’s a reminder that cities can change – but there are choices to be made, priorities to be agreed upon.  Making it easier for people to drive into the city centre and to park isn’t going to help.

A large part of the issue with buses is that they’re stuck behind single-occupancy cars

The best way to make life easier for people who drive around Leeds is to make life easier for people who don’t.  You can do that by, for example, investing in more bus lanes.  By creating a joined-up network of high quality cycle lanes.  And, yes, by taking away road capacity from cars.

As I’ve suggested above, for most of us our travel modes aren’t fixed.  We just want to get from A to B.  Give us a better alternative and we’ll use it.  But that will involve tough choices over limited road space, which will probably upset a lot of people, because they’ll see lanes re-purposed for more efficient modes of transport like cycling and buses.

But if measures like more bus lanes mean that buses don’t get stuck behind big queues of people sat alone in cars, then more people will choose to take public transport, because it will be become relatively more attractive.  This will take cars off the road – leaving road space for those who do drive.

So although it may not like sound like it at times, I do have a lot of sympathy for people like Chris.  It really is not fun driving around Leeds.  So let’s make Leeds the Best City For Motorists.  By making it less attractive to drive.

What does #LeedsTransport look like to a 12 year old?

If you follow me on Twitter you’ll know that one of my favourite topics is #LeedsTransport.  It shouldn’t really be this way.   Getting around your city should be one of those things that’s incidental to the rest of your day – leaving you time and energy to get on with the important stuff.  But in Leeds, like in so many other cities, it doesn’t really work like that.

I mainly weave my way around the regular congestion on my bike.  But I use public transport a lot too.  As we’ve not owned a car for the best part of seven years, the quality of public transport, and the ease with which you can walk or cycle around Leeds, matters to us a lot as a family.

It’s why I do my best to campaign, read up on and ask questions about all things to do with transport.  Not because I have some kind of transport fetish (although just look at that tram) but because I think cities which get public transport right are better places for everyone to live in – however they choose to get around.

It’s also why I recently joined WYCA’s Leeds consultation committee on public transport (we meet quarterly – the next meeting’s in mid January).

One of the many reasons I’m interested in this is because I think it’s much easier to be a child or young person growing up in a city if it has decent public transport.  And, of course, what’s easy for a child is likely to make life easier for a parent.

As has been said many times, by Guillermo Peñalosa amongst others, if you design a city for eight year olds (or eighty year olds) it works for everyone.

Back to the story.  We hired a car over Christmas – as we usually do – and handed it back to Avis on Tuesday.  My son was due to go to see his friend over the other side of Leeds later that day.  So I set him the task of getting us there by bus.

The context is that for for a while we’ve been keen for him to be more independent – including about how he gets around his home city.  He started senior school recently so we’ve been preparing for a while to ensure he could travel independently to school.  As it happens he’s ended up walking to school most days – and in doing so has ended up encouraging a few of his friends to do the same.  Which is an interesting thing in itself – so many human behaviours are contagious (and walking is a sociable thing).

But back to buses.  I set him the task of getting us to his friend’s house so that in future he could go there on his own.  Research the options – sort out tickets – work out where to get on and off etc.  More independence for him – more time for me – and no need for another car on the road for the rest of us. I documented how we got on in this thread

The detail’s there – but I wanted to pick up on a few key points. For people to choose public transport – over the car – it has to be easy.  It has to be lots of other things too – reliable, clean, good value etc – but the ease with which you can just hop on a bus is vital.  I think it’s fair to say we’re getting better – but there’s still a long way to go.

On the positive side, things like Google Maps – with their  decent transport planner – make it a lot easier to work out how to get to places by bus.  It was no surprise that his first response to solving the problem was to Google it.

Yet on the downside ticketing is still far too complicated.  If my son didn’t already have a decent bit of bus wisdom, he’d have never worked that bit out.  If we assume you already had an Under 18 photo card, you’d then need to know that the first bus that Google Maps recommended is run by a different company to the second bus you’ll need to get.  So you’ll need a different ticket.  But you can ignore Google and get a different bus – that’s run by the same company as the second bus.  And you can get that day ticket on your phone.  Even though you couldn’t get a single ticket on your phone.

I do hope you’re keeping up.

It took around 45 minutes door to door, when a car journey would have taken 15.  But we’re playing the long game here – think of the independence and the benefits of that for him and for us.

But it was useful to see things through the eyes of a child.  How are you supposed to work out where to get off, when there’s no next stop info and the windows are steamed up?  Who might you ask if you’re not sure?  Can the driver even hear you through the security screen?

But we got there.  And it was fine.  So next time he wants to visit his friend he’ll be going on his own.  Good news all round.

And to round it all off a lovely thing happened on my bus home.  As a creature of habit, even when I’m on my own I tend to go upstairs and sit at the front.  So that’s what I did.

A few stops later I could hear two excited children coming up the stairs.  I realised immediately.  Here I was, sat at the front, on my phone, not making full use of those precious front seats.

The first child got to the top of the stairs, and we turned to eachother.  She said “Oh”, had a quick think, and then as politely as you like asked me if I’d move so she and her sister could sit there instead.   I was only too happy to oblige, knowing full well that her gift to me of a Twitter vignette was far greater than what I was offering her.

I walked down the bus and spotted a woman laughing – with me not at me – or at least that’s what I told myself.   I sat with her and we had a good chat about what had happened.    And it reminded me of that great Twitter hashtag #GreatThingsThatHappenedOnTransit  – and why better public transport is such a key ingredient for making Leeds a better place for us all to live in. 

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